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Arabian Prince 2006
Arabian Prince 2006
Arabian Prince 1985
Arabian Prince 1985
Arabian Prince on the cut
On the Turntables
Arabian Prince, Bobby Jimmy and Buckwheat
With Bobby Jimmy and Buckwheat
NWA back in the days
The Beginning of NWA
Arabian Prince 1987
Arabian Prince 1987
NWA are in the Panic Zone
There was no SUV at those times.
Egyptian Lover & Arabian Prince 2008
Egyptian Lover & Arabian Prince 2008
Arabian Prince
Fresh 80´s Style
Arabian Prince
(Arabian) Prince
Arabian Prince
Innovator on the keys

ARABIAN PRINCE OR THE PROFESSOR X

Born: June 17 1965
Real Name: Mike Lezan
Artist Name: Arabian Prince


Raised in Inglewood, California, Arabian got his first look at music production when visiting his father at local funk and soul radio station KACE. While attending high school, Prince would make and distribute mix tapes that he made at his dad's radio station. Before graduating, he was DJ-ing several high school events around Gardena. He took his mixing and rapping skills from the schoolyard to a Los Angeles club where he soon gained notoriety among the local hip-hop and electro scene. Before Arabian Prince officially started recording, he found his way in Los Angeles' electro movement and was soon added to the famous Uncle Jamms Army. Through the group, Arabian met with many ground-breaking musicians such as Ice-T, Egyptian Lover, The Taylor Brothers, DJ Pooh, DJ Slip, and many more. During his stay with UJA (Uncle Jamms Army), he saw the huge parties hosted throughout Southern California. Around 1983 or 1984, Arabian met with entertainer Russ Parr (Bobby Jimmy) and soon became part of the group Bobby Jimmy & The Critters when they formed.

Unlike UJA, his next group wouldn't be known for mobile DJ parties, but instead it served as a place for Arabian Prince to master his production skills. Prince was known to produce beats and occasionally provide background vocals on several tracks. At the age of 19, Prince was hooked up with local musicians Shayne Fair and Michael Berebes to release his debut single "Strange Life" on Russ Parr's Rapsur Records. During the same year he also worked on two Bobby Jimmy singles from the album Ugly Knuckle Butt. The next year Arabian Prince helped co-produce and rap on the group's E.P. Fresh Guys. After Rapsur Records merged with Macola Records Arabian put out another single on his short-lived Street Kut Records, releasing the acclaimed "Situation Hot" track. Arabian stuck with Bobby Jimmy for two more years with the releases of Roaches: The Beginning (1986) and Back & Proud (1987)

Throughout Prince's career with Bobby Jimmy & The Critters, the tracks "We Like Ugly women" and "Roaches" made the most noise. Through many concerts and publicity events, Arabian soon became friends with Dr. Dre and the World Class Wreckin' Cru. As clout of Bobby Jimmy & The Critters started to wind down, Dr. Dre and Eazy-E were in the midst of creating a west-coast rap group with a variety of musicians. The group would soon be known as N.W.A. An invitation to join a new rap group (possibly through the Wreckin Cru's Dr. Dre) led Arabian to become one of the original members of the N.W.A. The ground-breaking west coast hardcore rap group began seriously working on material after Dr. Dre and DJ Yella left the World Class Wreckin' Cru. Macola Records, signed a deal with the N.W.A to put out their material on wax.

The N*ggaz Wit Attitudes were originally formed by Dre and Eazy-E (a young Compton drug dealer). Dre used his connections to pick up friends such as Yella, Ice Cube, The Fila Fresh Crew (which included The D.O.C.), and many others. Some members, such as the Candyman, were recruited but never had a chance to record. Eazy-E picked up MC Ren (a graduate of Compton's Dominguiz High School). The first release by N.W.A (listed under Eazy-E) was the single to "Boyz-N-The-Hood". N.W.A's official debut single was for "8-Ball" & "Dopeman" and included Arabian Prince's "Panic Zone" . The array of west coast emcees came together to release the album entitled "NWA and the Posse" in 1987. The majority of members of the group were primarily used to help put out N.W.A's name, and they were not included in any future recordings. The group narrowed down to Eazy, Dre, Yella, Ice Cube, D.O.C., and Arabian. 

Opposed to the pervious album which was mostly party songs with a few explicit moments, N.W.A were creating an album that would soon be known as one of the orignal "gangsta-rap" albums. The second N.W.A album was one that would gain infamy. Straight Outta Compton would be an album that contained highly offensive lyrics for their listeners and a song that would later get the group in trouble with the FBI (F**k Tha Police). With the group's growing popularity, Eazy-E picked up Jerry Heller to help coordinate the group's future plans. However Arabian Prince departed from the group that he co-founded just a few weeks before Straight Outta Compton was released in 1988 due to management problems. Nevertheless, the song "Something 2 Dance 2" (featuring Arabian), included on the N.W.A album, is a reminder of the forgotten member that is pictured on the album cover between DJ Yella and Ice Cube.

N.W.A gained nationwide attention almost right after Arabian Prince left, leaving one to only contemplate how this might of affected his career if he would have stayed. Soon after going solo, Arabian started work on his second album titled Brother Arab, released in 1989 through Orpheus Records. This album primarily blended electro-rap with soul/funk samples, creating an overall party album. The first single, "She's Got A Big Posse", exposed Prince coast to coast with a music video that found airplay on the television program "Yo! MTV Raps". That song put Brother Arab on the R&B/rap charts very briefly. Other noteworthy singles were "Situation Critical" and "Getting Down". Arabian Prince was also credited for his production at this time, producing J.B.'s Freak City (1989) ; DJ Madame E & The Mistress' Leather & Lace (1989) ; Professor X´s  Professor X Saga (1989) ,  J.J. Fad's Not Just A Fad (1990); Queens of Compton's West Coast Thang (1990); MC Smooth's Smooth & Legit: The Album (1990); Nic'ee Quikk's Nic'ee Trickki (1992); and Poetry In Motion's Staying Down In South Central (1993).

"Ya'll didn't think I was gonna be back for the nine-trey" - Arabian Prince Besides minor production work, Arabian Prince didn't seem he would have the urge to create another album after his over-looked Brother Arab release. Through former connections with Orpheus Records, Arabian landed a deal with EMI America / Capitol Records to put out an album in 1991-1992. Although a full album was created, the A&R at Capitol decided to pull the release deciding that it was much too explicit. The would-be album, named The Underworld, contained a variety of tunes ranging from dance to hardcore rap. The sequel to "She's Got A Big Posse" was also intended to be released on the album. Consequently, Arabian started an independent record label and started to work again on another release a year later. Taking some of the unreleased tracks from The Underworld and new material, Prince musically seemed to reflected the overwhelming popularity of gangsta-rap music on the west coast at the time on his next album.

In 1993, Arabian Prince released his third album entitled Where's My Bytches. The album primarily found its way in swapmeets and local record shops in the Los Angeles vicinity. Besides Arabian's distinctive voice and sexual prowess, there are no other indicators that link the tracks on Where's My Bytches with previous works such as "Panic Zone", "Situation Hot" , and "She's Got A Big Posse". Unknown back-up rappers, female vocalists, and former N.W.A assistants Mike Simms (guitar) and Donovan "Dirt Biker" (recording) all came together in an attempt to emulate the synthesized g-funk sound that was swarming rap charts in the early to mid 1990's. Besides working on the debut album by rapper L.A. Nash in 1995, Prince produced music for television and film spots in the mid 90's while beginning to delve into computer animation during that time. Prince came back on the scene when he landed a job with Fox Interactive as a video game tester around 1999-2000.

Calling himself Arabian "Panic Zone" Nazel, he was credited for testing games with Fox and Sierra, such as No One Lives Forever and Evil Avatar. Arabian Prince has got involved with several projects in Korea that involve cartoon animation and special effect design. Future plans for the talented artist include movie production and a re-release of his classic 1980s tunes. In 2004-05 Arabian launched his own website specializing in DJ clothing equipment (OneFader.com). If he isn't DJing at local L.A. clubs or traveling overseas Arabian can be found playing golf and basketball.

Biography by Amin Eshaker www.compton.8m.com/arab

Interview Arabian Prince 2002
Author Edward Roberts

How did you first get hooked up on the west coast hip hop scene? And what was your first record? What year was it?
Wow, that was a looooong time ago. I started off when I was about 14 or 15 making my own mix tapes up at a radio station called KACE, my father worked there so I would go up there late at night about midnight and go into the production room and use all the records to make mixes and sell them to people at school. Then me and a buddy started to DJ school dances and stuff. I started rapping on the bleachers at lunch with others at school and then from there I had my own local club in L A called the cave. I DJ'd with everyone who was hot at the time,
Egypt, Dre, DJ 3D(RIP) Yella, Unknown, Bobcat, Rodney O & Joe Cooley and the list goes on. I did my first record in like 1982 0r 1983 I had no clue of what to do but just went in and cut Strange Life, at the same time I was doing beats and music and co producing Bobby Jimmy and the Critters.

What was your musical involvement in
Bobby Jimmy and The Critters? And is he a funny guy in real life?
Russ, aka Bobby Jimmy is a crazy fool, in a good way, he is funny 24/7. He asked me to come in and work on his records so I went in and Co-produced most of the tracks on his albums. I toured with them for a while as well. I just like doing different styles of music My mom was a music teacher so I learned all forms of music, I like play and make any style.

My favourite track from your early days is
"Innovator". Can you tell us a little more about your ideas behind this record and any anecdotes about the recording session?
I like that one as well, thats why I did 2 versions,
Innovator and Innovative Life. I have always liked vocoder so I decided to do something a little different and rap on top of the vocoder, it came out pretty cool. I like my records to have a lot of parts so I just keep adding stuff to give a layered sound. And I use a lot of different synths layered on top of each other, I dont like sounding like other records.

Could you tell us about your early live performances back in the 80s and who you used to play/tour/DJ with.
Most of the shows in the early 80s consisted of me,
Egypt, The Wreckin Cru Bobby Jimmy, and a little later The LA Dream Team, we would do the concerts around the country most of the time together.

What was
Dr Dre's involvement on "Innovative Life" ? Cos I see he has a credit. And who were The Sheiks?
Me and
Dre were in the studio a lot just messin around with beats and stuff and I needed to do another song for the single so we worked on that one together. Note the double breathing :).

"Strange Life" , "Take You Home Girl" EP, "It Ain't Tough" and "Situation Hot" are all the earliest records by you posted in the music section on EE.
Are there anyothers that came out on
Rapsur or other labels with your name on - pre-86?
There are a few more that I produced and or worked on, I will post those when I have all the proper credits and props to give :) I worked on a lot of stuff that did not have my name on it at the time, they just payed me for producing the track and I released the credits.

I think it was around 1987 that you were involved with the super group NWA and you were involved with them up to (and during) the "Straight Outta Compton" LP (cos i can see you on the cover...)
What was your direct contribution to the group and why did you leave?
"Panic Zone" is a killer cut by the way.....
I did some music and some mixing and a few raps on songs but there was this underlying problem with management and money so I just broke out to do some other things that I was working on at the time like the special effects company I own and the Video Game stuff.

What is your personal favourite musically from your own back catalogue? And what records do you wish you'd done differently?
I liked
Take You Home Girl and Innovative Life because they were the most fun to do on stage, also lets hit the beach was a funny cut, haha.

What were your favourite tracks in Hip-Hop/electro in the mid 80s by other artists?
Now were talking, lets see, hmmmm, Ok, My boy Juan ripped @#%$ up with CYBOTRON, Clear and R9, Of course Kraftwerk and Soul Sonic Force, but I really loved Trinere and Pretty Tony's stuff. I would love to do something with them even now to bring that sound back. I love tracks that have girls singing on them along with the hard techno sound.

Who was your biggest rival musically back in the day?
Didn't have one, everyone was cool back then, but I did have a little trouble with one of my 808's with the damn fantom clap triggering whenever it wanted to :)
Sounded cool though and you can hear it on my songs haha.

I enjoyed your solo LP "Brother Arab" in 1989. You're style had moved with the times. My favourites from that LP are "Situation Critical" and "She's Got A Big Posse".... Was it difficult going it alone after being a member of such a high profile hip hop group.
Not really, by that time I was a little tired of all the music biz drama and having to chase fools for my money, I was making so much more in computer and film stuff.

What do you listen to today?
I listen to the old techno cuts from the 80's still as well as the new hot stuff on the radio, it seems that the sound we built so long ago is stronger than ever.

What new projects are in the pipeline; musically and otherwise?
I have 2 new music projects, one rap and one techno, I am also doing a comedy film next year. I have had my vacation now, I think it's time to do that thang again, I am not sure if I will use Arabian Prince or Professor X I like X a little more now, I want to see if my music can stand on its own without any hype.

It's been some time since your last LP "Where's my Bytches?". What have you been doing since?
I own a special effects company here and an animation studio in Korea, we have a cartoon on Korean TV now called KimchiPong its the hottest cartoon there, We are looking to bring it here next year. And I just started a line of clothes, it gets cold when your naked.

Who would you like to work with in the future? And who would you like to work with again from the past?
Like we talked about, me and
Unknown DJ are about to do some things, I need to get at Egypt as well so If anyone has his email send it to me, we want Juan Atkins, I think Unknown talkes to him often, we are going to do a mad compilation And I think I will reach out to Sir Mix a lot as well. I we can pull it off it will be the biggest thing since the cure for cooties.
Peace…
Arabian Prince AKA Professor X
"Keep your 808 with you at all times"

Arabian Prince
Strange Live
Rapsur
RP 10002
1984
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
Knuckle Draggers
Rapsur
RP 10003
1984
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
Big Butt
Rapsur
RP 10004
1984
Arabian Prince
It ain´t tough
Rapsur
RP 10005
1985
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
Ugly Knuckle Butt LP
Rapsur
RP 10009
1985
Russ Parr
It´s magic
Rapsur
RP 10012
1985
T.Omar
I´m only nine
Rapsur
RP 10013
1985
Arabian Prince and the Sheiks
Take you home girl
Rapsur
RP 10014
1985
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
Fresh Guys
Rapsur
RP 10015
1985
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
Gotta Potty
Rapsur
RP 10020
1985
Arabian Prince
Situation Hot
Macola
MRC-0944
1986
Arabian Prince & the Sheiks
Situation Hot
Street Kut
SKR 1501
1986
Critters with Bobby Jimmy
The Check is in the Mail
 Macola
MRC-0912
1985
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
Roaches
 Macola
MRC-0924
1986
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
Roaches the Beginning Album
 Macola
MRC-0933
1986
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
N.Y. Rapper / Real Bad Breath
 Macola
MRC-0947
1986
Bobby Jimmy and the Critters
Snake
 Macola
MRC-0967
1987
Bobby Jimmy & the Critters
Back and Proud Album
 Macola
MRC-0989
1987
Bobby Jimmy And The Critters
Bobby Jimmy You A Fool
 Macola
MRC-1009
1987
Bobby Jimmy & the Critter b.w. And General Jeff
Milkshake / Overlapping Waist
 Macola
MRC-1025
1987
Bobby Jimmy And The Critters
One Glove
 Macola
MRC-1042
1987
MC Bobby Jimmy
Lots Of Children
 Macola
MRC-1063
1987
J.J. Fad
Supersonic
Dream Team
DTR-632
1987
J.J. Fad
Another Ho
Dream Team
DTR - 1013
1987
J.B. Beat
Freak City
 Red Beat / Macola
MRC-1066
1988
Professor X
Professor X (Saga)
Techno Kut
TK 1209
1989

Arabian Prince

Brother Arab Album

Orpheus

D1 75614
1989
Arabian Prince
She´s got a big Posse
Orpheus
V 72259
1989
Arabian Prince
Situation Critical
Orpheus
V 72265
1989
Arabian Prince
Dope Thang
Orpheus
V 72290
1989
Arabian Prince
Where´s my Bitches Album
Da Bozak
6969
1993
Arabian Prince
Innovator
Lone
Lone 05
2005
Professor X
Statix / Rekonstruktx
Clone
C 44
2006
Bobby Jimmy´s big hit "Roaches", which was a comedy version of "Timex Social Club - Rumors" were directed by Neal Brown, a resident of Burbank, California who also did the video to L.A. Dream Team´s Nursery Rhymes. In the background you can see Arabian Prince and General Jeff dancing.
J. J. Fad (Just Jammin' Fresh and Def) was an LA-based trio of female rappers: MC J.B. (Juana Burns), Baby-D (Dania Birks) and Sassy C. (Michelle Franklin).The song was produced solely by Arabian Prince on Dream Team Records, and when all did not go well with the money there, he took the song back and re-released it on Ruthless and brought Dre and Yella onboard. Supersonic spawned the titular chart hit (Billboard Hot 100: peaked at #31), and was the first Grammy nominated record by a female hip-hop group.
Arabian Prince live on the turntables in 2006. Playin the song Party from Egyptian Lover.